A Continuing Conversation

I saw this quote in my writing inspiration book last week, and it got me to thinking about my goals for blogging. Then, my thoughts expanded to include what I think we all hope for from a conversation. First, let me share the quote by Andrew Sullivan. “A blog is in many ways a continuing conversation.” Mr. Sullivan was one of the first mainstream journalists to experiment with this form of writing almost twenty years ago and soon had a large following on his blog. He was able to have a continuing conversation with his followers through the comments and was able to receive almost instantaneous feedback on his work.

Now, it’s almost twenty years later, and there are many, many more blogs. Some of them have large followings and some, not so much. I fall into the latter category. Barely 100 followers, and maybe a couple hundred more who access the link through my Facebook and Twitter. Actually, there’s no way to know exactly how many can access my blog link on social media. I’ve had some comments over the years I’ve been writing these posts, but nothing that would say it was wildly popular. I’m not complaining though. Having this space has given me the opportunity to practice my writing in public, work through some things from my past, work through some faith questions, have some good conversations, and meet some neat people. It has shown me that I can do this writing thing and that I can be consistent with it.

Reading this quote though has brought to mind all of the conversations I’ve had on this blog, on the Internet, and in real life. Have I done my best to ensure those conversations can be continuing? Have I been flexible enough to agree to disagree or have I wanted to be proven right each and every time–rigid enough where someone felt like they had to walk away from a relationship? I’ve fallen on both sides. We all have. In an effort to change how I interact with people, I haven’t talked about the most divisive items in our society for a long time–race, poverty, politics, abortion, immigration, any issue that could be divisive. What good does it do to scream about something when I can spend my time and energy loving the people in my life the way Jesus wants me to?

But, I think Jesus would want us to talk about the hard stuff. The stuff that keeps us from having relationships. The stuff we use to climb the judging pedestal because it hasn’t happened to us. The stuff that is too different from our norm.

Like abortion, for example. I think abortion is wrong. It is killing a child who has never had the chance to life. But, I know people who have had abortions, and I have no way of knowing the factors that led them to their decision. So, I refuse to judge. Jesus loves the woman who had an abortion just as much as He loves the rest of us.

And, what about poverty? So many things factor into being poor. Race, unemployment, gender, country of birth, mental illness. Those of us who are more fortunate just turn a blind eye to the less fortunate and argue about the politics of it all. I remember the times my husband has been unemployed and thinking constantly that people were judging us. Judging eyes seemed to be everywhere.

Isn’t that why we need a continuing conversation? To acknowledge the hard stuff. To practice grace with the people Jesus loves as much as He loves us. To listen, really listen, to the person with an opposing view and not think how we’re going to reply the whole time. Over the past few years, I have worked on opening my heart to new and different viewpoints and to trying new things. I haven’t been perfect, but I have felt my heart getting softer and more in tune with this faith I practice. May we all be willing to have continuing conversations full of grace and love!

Have a great day, everyone!

 

4 Replies to “A Continuing Conversation”

  1. Lately, what has been laid on my mind is how I must not avoid the hard stuff. There is a lot of misconception on Christian views because the love is recessive while our opinions are out in the forefront. Our blogs give us an opportunity to show grace and love while sharing on the hard stuff. In reality, hard talk cannot be bypassed. Our ability to love those who may disagree with us on issues that are generally divisive, and how the Holy Spirit can help us maintain a good relationship with those people is one of the many miracles of God.

    I really really loved reading this post, Alisa. Thank you.

    1. Amen! I liked what you said about love being recessive too. I believe many people I know don’t realize what their social media footprint looks like from what they say and what they share. I’ll need to consider that the next time I want to share an opinion. Love and grace first, then the hard stuff. Thanks, Seyi!

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